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CCSD students earn perfect score on ACT

Each year, less than one-tenth of one percent of the students who take the ACT earns the top score. Among the test takers in the graduating class of 2013, only 1,162 out of 1.8 million students earned a 36. Each year, less than one-tenth of one percent of the students who take the ACT earns the top score. Among the test takers in the graduating class of 2013, only 1,162 out of 1.8 million students earned a 36.

Daniel Book earns perfect score on ACTSix students in the Cherry Creek School District earned a perfect 36 on the ACT test given to all Colorado high school juniors on April 23, 2014. One of the six is Daniel Book, now a senior at Cherry Creek High School.

“I was really surprised, very happy,” said Book, who said he didn’t do any special test preparation. “I took it once before and got a 33, but that was my only preparation. I didn’t buy a book or take a class.”

Each year, less than one-tenth of one percent of the students who take the ACT earns the top score. Among the test takers in the graduating class of 2013, only 1,162 out of 1.8 million students earned a 36.

In a letter recognizing Book’s outstanding achievement, ACT CEO Jon Whitmore said, “While test scores are just one of the many criteria that most colleges consider when making admission decisions, your exceptional ACT composite score should prove helpful as you pursue your education and career goals.”

Book is hoping his ACT score will help him earn admission to a top-tier college where he can also run track. He is considering Stanford, Princeton, Georgetown and Cornell.

The ACT consists of tests in English, mathematics, reading and science. Each test is scored on a scale of 1-36, and a student’s composite score is the average of the four test scores. Some students also take ACT’s optional Writing Test, but the score for that test is reported separately and not included in the ACT composite score.

Five of the six CCSD students who earned a perfect score attend Cherry Creek High School and the other attends Smoky Hill High School. In order to protect their privacy, ACT does not release the students’ names, but rather encourages them to contact their high school principals so they may be recognized for their outstanding academic accomplishment.